The Chinese University of Hong Kong Department of History Department of History
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HIST1700 Introduction to Public History: Theory and Practice

Semester 1 (2022-2023)

Lecture TimeTuesday, 16:30 - 18:15

VenueRoom G01, Lee Shau Kee Architecture Building (ARC G01)

LanguageEnglish

Lecturer POON Shuk Wah (swpoon@cuhk.edu.hk)

Teaching Assistant MANG Ming Fai, Kelvin (1155108628@link.cuhk.edu.hk)

Course Description

The field of public history has been expanding so rapidly since its inception in the 1970s that even public historians find it difficult to agree on a precise definition for public history. This course adopts a broad definition, which seeks to understand public history as a discipline in which historians practice history with a public audience in mind, and as a medium through which the general public acquire a sense of the past. Major topics examined in this course include museums, heritage, films, public monuments and tourism, etc. Local and global examples are used.

Syllabus
  1. Public History: A Changing Discipline
  2. Bridging the Gap between Historians and the Public
  3. Popular Uses of History
  4. Presenting the Past: Museums
  5. Power Politics of World Heritage
  6. Changing Definitions of Heritage: From Tangible to Intangible
  7. Marketing History and Heritage: A Local Perspective
  8. Marketing History and Heritage: A Global Perspective
  9. History and the Mass Media
  10. Projecting History in Public Space: Monuments and Power
  11. Public History and Collective Memory
  12. Gender and Public History
  13. Conclusion: The Future of Public History
Assessment & Assignments
Tutorial Participation and Discussion 20%
Presentation 15%
Essays 65%
Tutorials

TBC

References
  1. Public History: A Changing Discipline
  • Cauvin, Thomas. Public History: A Textbook of Practice (New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2016), Ch. 1, “Introduction.”
  • Kelley, Robert. “Public History: Its Origins, Nature, and Prospects.” Public Historian1 (Fall 1978), pp. 16-28.

 

  1. Bridging the Gap between Historians and the Public
  • Thomas A. Woods, “Museums and the Public: Doing History Together.” Journal of American History (Dec. 1995): 1111-1115.
  • Thompson, Paul. The Voice of the Past: Oral History (Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, 2000).

 

  1. Popular Uses of History
  • Cauvin, Thomas. Public History: A Textbook of Practice (New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2016), Ch. 3, “Collecting and Preserving People’s Stories. Oral History, Family History, and Everyday Life.”
  • Rosenzweig, Roy and David Thelen. The Presence of the Past: Popular Uses of History in American Life (New York: Columbia University Press, 1998).

 

  1. Presenting the Past: Museums
  • Carroll, John M. “Displaying the Past to Serve the Present: Museums and Heritage Preservation in Post-Colonial Hong Kong.” Twentieth-Century China 31 (2005), pp. 76-103.
  • Linenthal, Edward T & Tom Engelhardt eds. History Wars: The Enola Gay and Other Battles for the American Past (New York: Metropolitan Books, 1996).
  • Yoshida, Takashi. From Cultures of War to Cultures of Peace: War and Peace Museums in Japan, China, and South Korea (Portland, Maine: MerwinAsia, 2014).

 

  1. Power Politics of World Heritage
  • Logan, William. “States, Governance and the Politics of Culture: World Heritage in Asia.” In Routledge Handbook of Heritage in Asia (Oxon, Routledge, 2012), pp. 113-128.
  • Meskell, L., Liuzza, C., Bertacchini, E. and Saccone, D. “Multilateralism and UNESCO World Heritage: Decision-making, States Parties and Political Processes.” International Journal of Heritage Studies, 21:5 (2015), pp. 423-440.
  • Smith, Laurajane. Uses of Heritage (London & New York, Routledge, 2006).

 

  1. Changing Definitions of Heritage: From Tangible to Intangible
  • Liu, Tik-sang, ed. Intangible Cultural Heritage and Local Communities in East Asia (Hong Kong: South China Research Center, HKUST, 2011).
  • Lowenthal, David. Possessed by the Past: The Heritage Crusade and the Spoils of History (New York: Free Press, 1996).

 

  1. Marketing History and Heritage: A Local Perspective
  • Cheung, Sidney C. H. “Remembering through Space: The Politics of Heritage in Hong Kong.” International Journal of Heritage Studies, 9:1 (Mar 2003), pp. 7-26.
  • Henderson, Joan. “Heritage, Identity and Tourism in Hong Kong.” International Journal of Heritage Studies, 7: 3 (2001): 219-235.

 

  1. Marketing History and Heritage: A Global Perspective
  • Figal, Gerald. Beachheads: War, Peace, and Tourism in Postwar Okinawa (Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 2012).
  • White, Leanne and Elspeth Frew, eds. Dark Tourism and Place Identity: Managing and Interpreting Dark Places (Abingdon, Oxon; New York: Routledge, 2013).

 

  1. History and the Mass Media
  • Carnes, Mark C., ed. Past Imperfect: History According to the Movies (New York: Henry Holt, 1995).
  • Rosenstone, Robert A. History on Film, Film on History (New York: Pearson Education Limited 2006).

 

  1. Projecting History in Public Space: Monuments and Power
  • Goldman, Natasha. “Israeli Holocaust Memorial Strategies at Yad Vashem: From Silence to Recognition.” Art Journal (Summer 2006), pp. 102–22.
  • Hayden, Dolores. The Power of Place: Urban Landscapes as Public History (Cambridge: MIT Press, 1997).

 

  1. Public History and Collective Memory
  • Burke, Peter. “History as Social Memory.” In Varieties of Cultural History (Ithaca, New York, Cornell University Press, 1997), pp. 43-59.
  • Li, Fei Fei, Robert Sabella & David Liu (eds.) Nanking 1937: Memory and Healing (Armonk, N.Y.: M.E. Sharpe, 2002), pp. 75-94.
  • Winter, Jay, Remembering War: The Great War between Memory and History in the Twentieth Century (New Haven & London: Yale University Press, 2006).

 

  1. Gender and Public History
  • Levin, Amy K. ed. Gender, Sexuality, and Museums: A Routledge Reader (New York: Routledge, 2010).
  • Mayo, Edith P. “Women’s History and Public History: The Museum Connection.” The Public Historian, 5: 2 (Spring 1983), pp. 63-73.
  • Smith, Laurajane. “Heritage, Gender and Identity.” In Brian Graham and Peter Howard, eds. The Ashgate Research Companion to Heritage and Identity (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2008), pp. 159-178.

 

  1. Conclusion: The Future of Public History
  • Sayer, Faye. Public History: A Practical Guide (London: Bloomsbury, 2015), “Conclusion.”
Honesty in Academic Work

Attention is drawn to University policy and regulations on honesty in academic work, and to the disciplinary guidelines and procedures applicable to breaches of such policy and regulations. Details may be found at http://www.cuhk.edu.hk/policy/academichonesty/.

With each assignment, students will be required to submit a signed declaration that they are aware of these policies, regulations, guidelines and procedures.

  • In the case of group projects, all members of the group should be asked to sign the declaration, each of whom is responsible and liable to disciplinary actions, irrespective of whether he/she has signed the declaration and whether he/she has contributed, directly or indirectly, to the problematic contents.
  • For assignments in the form of a computer-generated document that is principally text-based and submitted via VeriGuide, the statement, in the form of a receipt, will be issued by the system upon students’ uploading of the soft copy of the assignment.

Assignments without the properly signed declaration will not be graded by teachers.

Only the final version of the assignment should be submitted via VeriGuide.

The submission of a piece of work, or a part of a piece of work, for more than one purpose (e.g. to satisfy the requirements in two different courses) without declaration to this effect shall be regarded as having committed undeclared multiple submissions. It is common and acceptable to reuse a turn of phrase or a sentence or two from one’s own work; but wholesale reuse is problematic. In any case, agreement from the course teacher(s) concerned should be obtained prior to the submission of the piece of work.

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