The Chinese University of Hong Kong Department of History Department of History
Contact Us

HIST2001B Historiography (Introductory)

Semester 1 (2021-2022)

Lecture TimeTuesday 2:30pm - 4:15pm

VenueWMY 403

LanguageEnglish

Lecturer LEE Hiu Hong Michael

Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the theory, study and writing of History, and includes an analysis of the changes in the methods, assumptions and purposes of historical investigation over time. This will introduce basic conceptual and methodological matters within the field of History, and help bring to the fore areas of theoretical interest to past and present-day historians. The course is split into three parts. The first part surveys the development of the discipline of History. The second part of the course focuses on introducing methodological themes connected to History in order to demonstrate how historical materials, interviews, and perspectives can come together in the production of History. The third part of the course touches upon matters related to writing, such as research methods, reading and critical thinking, analysis and the basics of historical composition writing. 

Syllabus

Week

Date

Topic & Reading

 

1

7 Sep

Introduction: History and Historiography (Lecture)

 

M. Gilderhus, History and Historians: A Historiographical Introduction. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2010, pp. 1-11.

 

R. Williams, The Historian’s Toolbox: A Student’s Guide to the Theory and Craft of History (3rd Edition). Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, pp. 1-19.

 

2

14 Sep

Historical Knowledge and Consciousness (Lecture)

Historical Sources (Workshop)

 

M. Gilderhus, History and Historians: A Historiographical Introduction. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2010, pp. 12-49.

 

3

21 Sep

From History to “New” History (Lecture)

Library Search for Historical Research (Workshop)

 

M. Bloch, The Historian’s Craft. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1959, pp. 3-47.

 

4

28 Sep

Historians and Historical Research (Lecture)

Choosing Historical Research Topic (Workshop)

 

M. Fulbrook, Historical Theory. London and New York: Routledge, 2002, pp. 3-30.

 

 

5

5 Oct

Asian Historiography (Lecture)
Formulating Research Aims and Arguments (Workshop)

 

G. Iggers & Q. Wang, A Global History of Modern Historiography. London: Routledge, 2008, pp. 208-227, 317-337.

 

6

12 Oct

Linkage between History and Society (Lecture)
Reviewing Research Literature (Workshop)

 

D. Macraild & A. Taylor, Social Theory and Social History. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004, pp. 1-32.

 

7

19 Oct

Gender and History (Lecture)

Historical Research Methods and Formats (Workshop)

 

S. Kent, Gender and History, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012, pp. 49-85.

 

8

26 Oct

History in the Public Sphere (Lecture)

Presenting Findings and Analysis (Workshop)

 

R. Kelley, “Public History: Its Origins, Nature, and Prospects”, The Public Historian, 1 (1), 1978, pp. 16-28.

 

D. Glassberg, “Public History and the Study of Memory”, The Public Historian, 18 (2), 1996, pp. 7-23.

 

9

2 Nov

History from a Comparative Perspective (Lecture)
Writing Discussion and Conclusion (Workshop)

 

G. Steinmetz, “Comparative History and Its Critics: A Genealogy and a Possible Solution”, in P. Duara, V. Murthy & A. Sartori (Eds.), A Companion to Global Historical Thought, Malden and Oxford: Wiley Blackwell, 2014, pp. 412-435.

 

M. Adas, “Comparative History and the Challenge of the Grand Narrative”, in D. Northrop (Ed.), A Companion to World History, Malden and Oxford: Wiley Blackwell, 2012, pp. 230-243.

 

10

9 Nov

Writing History (1)

 

R. Williams, The Historian’s Toolbox: A Student’s Guide to the Theory and Craft of History (3rd Edition). Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 2012, Part II. The Tools of History.

 

W. Storey, Writing History: Guide for Students. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999.

 

11

16 Nov

Writing History (2)

 

R. Williams, The Historian’s Toolbox: A Student’s Guide to the Theory and Craft of History (3rd Edition). Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 2012, Part II. The Tools of History.

 

W. Storey, Writing History: Guide for Students. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999.

 

12

23 Nov

Student Presentations on Research Paper

 

 

13

30 Nov

Conclusion

 

 

Assessment & Assignments

Tutorials: 25 Marks (Tutorial topics are tentative and subject to confirmation.)

 

There are four tutorial sessions, which are compulsory. Each student will be held responsible to do a presentation on one of the first three tutorial topics together with a presentation on Term Paper in the final tutorial.

 

Tutorial 1: Key Thinkers on History

  1. Hughes-Warrington, Fifty Key Thinkers on History (Third Edition). London and New York: Routledge, 2015.

 

Tutorial 2: History and Society

  1. Burke, Sociology and History. London: George Allen & Unwin, 1980.

 

Tutorial 3: “New History”

  1. Burke ed., New Perspectives on Historical Writing (Second Edition). University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2001.

 

Tutorial 4: Presentation on Research Paper

 

Tutorial Review Essay: 25 Marks

 

Write a short essay around 2,000 words on one of the first three tutorial topics being assigned.

Term Paper: 50 Marks

 

Write an essay in English on any history topic with around 4,000. The submission deadline will be before mid-December.

 

Honesty in Academic Work

Attention is drawn to University policy and regulations on honesty in academic work, and to the disciplinary guidelines and procedures applicable to breaches of such policy and regulations. Details may be found at http://www.cuhk.edu.hk/policy/academichonesty/.

With each assignment, students will be required to submit a signed declaration that they are aware of these policies, regulations, guidelines and procedures.

  • In the case of group projects, all members of the group should be asked to sign the declaration, each of whom is responsible and liable to disciplinary actions, irrespective of whether he/she has signed the declaration and whether he/she has contributed, directly or indirectly, to the problematic contents.
  • For assignments in the form of a computer-generated document that is principally text-based and submitted via VeriGuide, the statement, in the form of a receipt, will be issued by the system upon students’ uploading of the soft copy of the assignment.

Assignments without the properly signed declaration will not be graded by teachers.

Only the final version of the assignment should be submitted via VeriGuide.

The submission of a piece of work, or a part of a piece of work, for more than one purpose (e.g. to satisfy the requirements in two different courses) without declaration to this effect shall be regarded as having committed undeclared multiple submissions. It is common and acceptable to reuse a turn of phrase or a sentence or two from one’s own work; but wholesale reuse is problematic. In any case, agreement from the course teacher(s) concerned should be obtained prior to the submission of the piece of work.

Back to top