The Chinese University of Hong Kong Department of History Department of History
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GESC2150 Reconstruction of Hong Kong History and Social Development

Semester 1 (2021-2022)

Lecture TimeFriday 14:30-16:15

VenueLSK LT2

LanguageCantonese

Lecturer LO Shuk Ying (39437120 / sylo@cuhk.edu.hk)

Course Description

This course introduces basic research methodologies on Hong Kong history, which include the use of primary sources, oral history materials and analysis of secondary sources. Through the evaluation of the characteristics of different interpretations on major Hong Kong historical events and personalities since 1840 and its impact on the development of Hong Kong society, students can re-examine their local cultural heritage and their commitment to the community. Field trips and topical studies will be organised to explore the evolution of local society through personal experience.

Syllabus

(Tentative)

Date

Topic

10/9

Introduction

17/9

The First Opium War and ceding of Hong Kong

24/9

The structure of the colonial government

8/10

Hong Kong society in the late 19th Century

15/10

British lease of the New Territories

22/10

Hong Kong and Chinese politics

30/10

Inter-war social problems

5/11

Japanese Occupation

12/11

Post-war Hong Kong society

19/11

Riots

26/11

The era of MacLehose

3/12

The return of Hong Kong and identity crisis

Assessment & Assignments

Tutorial

20%

Report

20%

Final Paper

60%

Tutorials

To be announced.

References

Carroll, John M.A Concise History of Hong Kong. Lanham : Rowman & Littlefield, 2007.[UL Rev Call # DS796.H757 C28 2007 ]

Welsh, Frank. A History of Hong Kong, rev. ed. London : HarperCollins, 1997. [UL HK Studies  DS796.H757 W454 1997]

Endacott, G.B., Government and People in Hong Kong, 1841-1962: A Constitutional History, Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1982. [UL Reserve Call # JQ673 1964 .E5  ]

Tsang, Steve, A Modern History of Hong Kong. London; New York: I.B. Tauris, 2004 (e-book).

Welsh, Frank, A History of Hong Kong, London, Harper Collins, 1997, 3rd.[ UL HK Studies  DS796.H757 W454 1997  ]

Endacott, G.B., Government and People in Hong Kong, 1841-1962: A Constitutional History, Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1982. [UL Reserve Call # JQ673 1964 .E5  ]

Tsang, Steve, A Modern History of Hong Kong. London; New York: I.B. Tauris, 2004 (e-book).

Welsh, Frank, A History of Hong Kong, London, Harper Collins, 1997, 3rd.[ UL HK Studies  DS796.H757 W454 1997  ]

王賡武,《香港史新編》,香港,三聯書店(香港)有限公司,2017年。[UL Reserve Call #  DS796.H757 H7358 2017  ]

蔡榮芳:《香港人之香港史,1841-1945》,香港 : 牛津大學出版社, 2001. [UL Reserve C即Call # DS796.H757 C257 2001  ]

 

Honesty in Academic Work

Attention is drawn to University policy and regulations on honesty in academic work, and to the disciplinary guidelines and procedures applicable to breaches of such policy and regulations. Details may be found at http://www.cuhk.edu.hk/policy/academichonesty/.

With each assignment, students will be required to submit a signed declaration that they are aware of these policies, regulations, guidelines and procedures.

  • In the case of group projects, all members of the group should be asked to sign the declaration, each of whom is responsible and liable to disciplinary actions, irrespective of whether he/she has signed the declaration and whether he/she has contributed, directly or indirectly, to the problematic contents.
  • For assignments in the form of a computer-generated document that is principally text-based and submitted via VeriGuide, the statement, in the form of a receipt, will be issued by the system upon students’ uploading of the soft copy of the assignment.

Assignments without the properly signed declaration will not be graded by teachers.

Only the final version of the assignment should be submitted via VeriGuide.

The submission of a piece of work, or a part of a piece of work, for more than one purpose (e.g. to satisfy the requirements in two different courses) without declaration to this effect shall be regarded as having committed undeclared multiple submissions. It is common and acceptable to reuse a turn of phrase or a sentence or two from one’s own work; but wholesale reuse is problematic. In any case, agreement from the course teacher(s) concerned should be obtained prior to the submission of the piece of work.

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